Home / Diabetes / Type 2 diabetes / Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

A cellular metabolism problem

There is a new study that looks at the metabolic “tipping point” for type 2 diabetes and how sugar is transported in the pancreas. Cellular metabolism, in addition to genetic factors, is also very critical for the progression of type 2 diabetes.

Many type 2 diabetes cases are classified as the adult-onset, chronic metabolic disease.

Studies like this can help to indicate how sugar affects our bodies and thus how new prevention and healing practices can be developed. The concern is that the pancreas is not able to clearly sense blood sugars and secreting insulin.

While past research has not paid as close attention to cellular metabolism, new studies are considering ways that it plays a role in type 2 diabetes. Some researchers indicate that it may be even more important than our genetics.

Comprehensive factors including inflammation can impair glucose sensing/homeostasis during the development of type 2 diabetes characterized by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance.

The study indicates that when a person is happy they have “enough glucose to stay above the threshold.” However, the problem arises when the glucose levels go below that threshold. What is also exciting is that practices such as therapeutic intervention can help patients.

This research was funded by the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies (grant W911NF-09-0001 from the U.S. Army Research Office) and by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases grant DK048247 and National Institute of General Medical Sciences grant GM100192).

Luni, C., Marth, J., & Doyle, F. (2012). Computational Modeling of Glucose Transport in Pancreatic β-Cells Identifies Metabolic Thresholds and Therapeutic Targets in Diabetes PLoS ONE, 7 (12) DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0053130

JNK expression by macrophages promotes obesity-induced insulin resistance and inflammation from Science (2013)

The impact of the unfolded protein response on human disease from The Rockefeller University Press (2012)

Nutrient sensing and inflammation in metabolic diseases from Nature Reviews Immunology (2008)

MAPK signalling in cellular metabolism: stress or wellness? from EMBO reports (2010)

Read article from Stanford Burnham


Exercise can prevent early cardiovascular aging in Type 2

The benefits of exercise are often discussed, must be put in practice by people with diabetes. Adding a healthy diet improves the quality of life. Studies show that the cardiovascular systems of people with Type 2 diabetes age much earlier than those in people who do not have the condition. The good news is that exercise may be able to slow the process. Regular exercise like brisk walking is all it takes to help reduce the risk of early cardiovascular ageing with its attendant risks of early disability and death.

Although fitness levels tend to drop off as people age, the drop-off rate in healthy adults after the age of 40-50 is about 10 percent, while in people with diabetes, it is double that. By exercising 150 minutes a week, or about 22 minutes every day, individuals with Type 2 diabetes can increase their fitness levels by up to 40% after 12 to 20 weeks, which is closer to those who do not have diabetes.

Read Full Article from Medical News Today

Learn more about the pharmaceutical company focused on the development, manufacturing and commercialization of novel compounds: http://www.bostonti.com/

One thought on “Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

  1. Nice research on type 2 diabetes.
    Since many type 2 diabetes cases are classified as the adult-onset, chronic metabolic disease, it is reasonable to speculate that cellular metabolism, besides genetic factors, is also very critical for the progression of type 2 diabetes. On the other hand, more and more evidences have demonstrated that comprehensive factors including overwhelming inflammation can impair glucose sensing/homeostasis during the development of type 2 diabetes characterized by insulin resistance and glucose intolerance (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23223452, http://jcb.rupress.org/content/197/7/857.long, http://www.nature.com/nri/journal/v8/n12/abs/nri2449.html, and http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v11/n11/abs/embor2010160.html). Therefore high serum glucose level in type 2 diabetes is “different causes, same result”.

Comments are closed.

Top